How to Invest

GIC SAVING

Articles

Directory

Resources

Home


Articles

Ever Have A Problem With Your Credit Card Company

What happens if you complain, but you are found to be wrong? You need to know what your rights are. What if. .the bill is incorrect? If your bill contains an error, the creditor must explain to you - in writing - the corrections that will be made to your account. In addition to crediting your account, the creditor must remove all finance charges, late fees or other charges related to the error. If the creditor determines that you owe a portion of the disputed amount, you must get a written explanation.

You may request copies of documents proving you owe the money. .the bill is correct? If the creditor's investigation determines the bill is correct, you must be told promptly and in writing how much you owe and why.

You may ask for copies of relevant documents. At this point, you'll owe the disputed amount, plus any finance charges that accumulated while the amount was in dispute. You also may have to pay the minimum amount you missed paying because of the dispute. If you disagree with the results of the investigation, you may write to the creditor, but you must act within 10 days after receiving the explanation, and you may indicate that you refuse to pay the disputed amount. At this point, the creditor may begin collection procedures. However, if the creditor reports you to a credit bureau as delinquent, the report also must state that you don't think you owe the money.

The creditor must tell you who gets these reports. .the creditor fails to follow the procedure? Any creditor who fails to follow the settlement procedure may not collect the amount in dispute, or any related finance charges, up to $50, even if the bill turns out to be correct. For example, if a creditor acknowledges your complaint in 45 days - 15 days too late - or takes more than two billing cycles to resolve a dispute, the penalty applies. The penalty also applies if a creditor threatens to report - or improperly reports - your failure to pay to anyone during the dispute period. An important caveat Disputes about the quality of goods and services are not "billing errors," so the dispute procedure does not apply.

However, if you buy unsatisfactory goods or services with a credit or charge card, you can take the same legal actions against the card issuer as you can take under state law against the seller. To take advantage of this protection regarding the quality of goods or services, you must: - have made the purchase (it must be for more than $50) in your home state or within 100 miles of your current billing address; - make a good faith effort to resolve the dispute with the seller first. The dollar and distance limitations don't apply if the seller also is the card issuer - or if a special business relationship exists between the seller and the card issuer. Other billing rights Businesses that offer "open end" credit also must: - give you a written notice when you open a new account - and at certain other times - that describes your right to dispute billing errors; - provide a statement for each billing period in which you owe - or they owe you - more than one dollar; - send your bill at least 14 days before the payment is due - if you have a period within which to pay the bill without incurring additional charges; - credit all payments to your account on the date they're received, unless no extra charges would result if they failed to do so. Creditors are permitted to set some reasonable rules for making payments, say setting a reasonable deadline for payment to be received to be credited on the same date; and - promptly credit or refund overpayments and other amounts owed to your account.

This applies to instances where your account is owed more than one dollar. Your account must be credited promptly with the amount owed. If you prefer a refund, it must be sent within seven business days after the creditor receives your written request.

The creditor must also make a good faith effort to refund a credit balance that has remained on your account for more than six months. Suing the creditor You can sue a creditor who violates the FCBA. If you win, you may be awarded damages, plus twice the amount of any finance charge - as long as it's between $100 and $1,000. The court also may order the creditor to pay your attorney's fees and costs. If possible, hire a lawyer who is willing to accept the amount awarded to you by the court as the entire fee for representing you.

Some lawyers may not take your case unless you agree to pay their fee - win or lose - or add to the court-awarded amount if they think it's too low.

Apply online in seconds for a 0% APR credit card - many to choose from at Credit Card Repair
Submitted by: Article Submitter



Building Wealth






Quick sell tips - Often wonder why some houses can have a number of showings after its first week on the market, and similar ones seems to be left with no attention? A quick sell of a house is common enough to be expected by home sellers, but rare enough to remain a phenomenon in the market.

Oxfordshire Prime Property Remains Hot - Oxfordshire estate agents have been talking about the growth in million pound houses and the increase in millionaire homes coming to market for a long time.

Do you need tips to sell your house fast - Sometimes, we have to sell our homes fast.

Popular Subjects The People Will Pay For - IIf you're still having a hard time trying to figure out which niche market to go into, start by simply spending some time asking questions of yourself.

Best on the Web How to Locate Research Fund Your Next Real Estate Deal - If you?re tired of trying to put together a real estate deal that will move you closer to your ever-elusive goal of financial independence you need to put the power of the Internet to work for you.

more...

ęCopyright 2020 CraigieTaylor.com All rights reserved.
Unauthorized duplication in part or whole strictly prohibited by international copyright law.